Self-Mastery and Skill Development Using the Plus 1 Mastery Process for Change

The Plus 1 Mastery Process for Personal Change

Here is the learning process: Tell me… show me… let me practice… coach me.

In attempting to change behavior it is important to look at an “old true and tried” principle of learning called the law of frequency. The law of frequency suggests that the more a person practices the correct and desired behavior, the higher the probability there is to use the desired behavior.  This principle is often called “drill and practice”. Most coaches and movie directors use this technique to encourage their players or actors to practice under many different situations until they get it right and the behavior feels natural.  Remember, practice makes permanent only, perfect practice makes perfect.

The key building block in using the law of frequency in training is to create what we call the PlusOne Mastery Learning Sequence:

  • The sequence starts by learning and understanding the specific skill you are trying to change one step at a time while adding each new step to the preceding learned steps until all steps are mastered.
  • The “chucking principle” is a key component of the Mastery Learning sequence. This principle suggests that a complex skill can be learned most efficiently when the skill is broken down into small parts.  Each part is mastered separately and then the parts are practiced together adding one “chunk” at a time until all of the chunks are integrated and the complex skill is mastered
  • Once learned the skill set is enhanced by putting in-place a continuous improvement process which involves a feedback loop on where you are now by examining what you are doing well and what improvements you need to stay at the mastery level.
  • Learning and using this simple and straight forward “Plus 1 Mastery” process will improve your self-awareness of effective behavioral patterns and can help identify areas for improvement so that you can overcome and transcend present limits of leadership styles into a strength based approach for continuous professional development.

 

 

 

High Performer and 10,000 hour Success Factor–Apply these three Secrets.

Here is some good news and bad news about becoming successful in whatever field of endeavor you choose. Good news is that it will take about 10 years or 10,000 hours to master the knowledge and experience to make it “big” The bad news is that most be , including coaches and bosses are impatient and don’t want to put in the effort and target practice to achieve at the mastery level. In other words, most of us give up before we have a chance to succeed.

“Successful people spontaneously do things differently from those individuals who stagnate. They have different practice histories. Elite performers engage in what we call “deliberate practice”–an effortful activity designed to improve individual target performance. There has to be some way they’re innovating in the way they do things.”  K. Anders Ericsson, Professor of Psychology Florida State University 

The old struggle between “nurture and nature” goes on, but in his 900+ book and over twenty-five+ years of research Ericsson builds the case for practice, perseverance and patience. He says with the exception of some sports–“no characteristic of the brain or body constrains an individual from reaching an expert level.”  So what are the keys to success–Here is a snap shot of what Ericsson says are the secrets to “Performance Mastery”

1.  Targeted and deliberate practice– they spontaneously do things differently from those individuals who stagnate. They practice differently from average performers–“They have different practice histories. Elite performers engage in what we call “deliberate practice”–an effortful activity designed to improve individual target performance. ”   

 2. Being passionate and curious–in other words a live-long student–seeking out answers to questions and looking for innovative ways to capture knowledge and experience. Both theirs and others.

3. Seek feedback on how they are doing and how they can improve.  Just enjoying what you do makes a critical difference in performance.