Growing Resilience: Learn to Embrace Stress and Recovery

Art by Todd Hardwick—Streams of Life

Daily Quote: Dr. James Loehr, founder of the Human Performance Institute, provides some clarity on stress by explaining the power of being able to snap back (resilience) from failures and upsets in daily life.” Resilience is a person’s capacity to respond to change and chaotic disruption and unforeseen setbacks and failures, by embracing change and bouncing back from failures with speed and grace through the process of recovery. This ability to embrace change is like the principle for how you build and strengthen muscles in the body, resilience is an acquired ability to skillfully move between (oscillate) cycles of stress and recovery”.

Dr. Loehr, in over thirty years of high performance research helps us understand that stress is a depletion of energy-out and recovery is energy-in. Both are essential ingredients in the formula of becoming mentality tough and resilient. Managing stress means learning how to restore forces of energy and renewal thereby rebuilding mental and physical reserves.

One of the best measures of resilience is speed of recovery. So some people rise to challenges and failures by acquiring new skills and habits of how to handle stress and learn from mistakes while significant numbers of people seemingly collapse under pressure and demands of the fast pace society we live in today. The difference between these two responses is the level of resilience both mentally and physically the individual brings to difficult situations and problems in their life.

As I said above, stress is a depletion of energy-out and recovery is energy-in. Embracing stress means learning how to restore forces of energy and renewal thereby rebuilding mental and physical reserves. Stress is one of the most misunderstood concepts in the world. However, stress is essential and vital to growth. All too often the culprit of our ills is not excessive stress but rather insufficient recovery. When we drain our mental, emotional, and physical reserves and don’t understand and learn the skills needed for recovery, the results can be costly from a spiritual, mental, physical and monetary perspective.

Mental Growth Challenge: Over the next 24 hours read more about thestress and recovery model and develop a Plus 1: Smart-Step plan to develop new attitudes and actions, so that you can build your resilience and embrace stress muscles. This positive approach will give you more energy and put you on s path to improve and change your “quality of life”.